Diet

Diet Helps Reduce Cardiac Disease in Women
At the conclusion of a recently published research article, scientists stated that a diet resembling The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet was significantly associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in women. The DASH eating plan consists of a high intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, moderated intake of legumes, nuts, and low-fat dairy products, and low intake of red and processed meats and sodium. For the details surrounding this study go to the Archives of Internal Medicine, Volume 168, No. 7, April 2008.

Eating Veggies Linked to Cognitive Health
A study published in Neurology had concluded that high amounts of vegetable consumption may be associated with a slower rate of cognitive decline in older people. The Rush Institute on Healthy Aging reported that eating three portions of leafy green, yellow, and cruciferous vegetables can slow the loss of mental function as people age, possibly by as much as 40 percent. Fruits were a part of the study, but had little to no effect on cognitive decline. Researchers theorize that is due to vegetables having a higher vitamin E content than fruit. Read More.

Cola May Weaken Bones
Cola soft drinks are associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), according to a new study out of Boston. Cola drinks contain phosphoric acid, which may adversely affect bone; and caffeine is suspected to lower BMD as well. Other non-cola carbonated drinks did not show the same bond-damaging results. Researchers suggested more research is needed to confirm the findings. Read about the study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, October 2006, Volume 84, Number 4. Read More.

Nutrient Intake Can Reduce Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
The National Cancer Institute recently released a study confirming that, “Higher intakes of vegetables, lutein and zeaxanthin, and zinc area associated with lower NHL [non-Hodgkin lymphoma] risk.” The study’s objective was to evaluate NHL risk with the intake of nutrients involved in antioxidant activity. A higher number of weekly servings of vegetables was related to a lower risk of NHL. For more information go to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, June 2006, Vol. 83. Read More

Nutrition Levels in Fruits & Veggies Worries Scientist
In a talk given at a recent meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), biochemist Donald Davis expressed concern over the nutrient content in several foods. Modern methods of growing, processing, and preparing food are robbing fruits, vegetables, and other food crops of their nutritional value, Davis said. Agricultural changes in pesticide use, plant growth regulators, fertilizer composition, and other factors have played a role in the reduction of nutrients — a reduction of 5 to 35% of normal levels of some vitamins, minerals, and protein. “High-yield crops grow bigger or faster,” said Davis, “but are not necessarily able to make or uptake sufficient nutrients to maintain their nutritional value.” For more information go to The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Read More.
Bone Health Impacted by Fruits at any Age
It’s no surprise or secret that regular intake of fresh fruits and vegetables can have a healthy impact on the bones of older people. But researchers in Cambridge, United Kingdom, recently studied the impact of fruits and vegetables on young people’s bones as well. Fruit seemed to play a bigger role in bone health than vegetables, with “significant positive associations” between fruit intake and bone health in adolescent boys, girl, and older women. The study concluded, “Higher fruit and vegetable intakes may have positive effects on bone mineral status in both younger and older age groups.” For more information go to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, June 2006, Vol. 83. Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, June 2006, Vol. 83. Read More.

Cholesterol Lowering Foods as Effective as Statins
Researchers from St. Michael’s Hospital and the University of Toronto recently reviewed the effectiveness of consuming a combination of cholesterol-lowering foods (dietary portfolio) under real-world conditions. As part of the study, 66 hyperlipidemic participants were prescribed diets high in plant sterols, soy protein, viscous fibers and almonds. After one year of observation, more than 30% of motivated participants who ate the prescribed dietary portfolio were able to lower LDL- cholesterol concentrations by 20 percent. This was the same impact as a first-generation statin. Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 83, March 2006. Read More.

Phytoestrogen Decreases Risk of Prostate Cancer
In a recent Swedish study, phytoestrogen was shown to decrease the risk of prostate cancer. The study compared questionnaire data from 1,499 people with prostate cancer and 1,130 cancer-free individuals. The results concluded that foods high in phytoestrogen such as soy, sunflower seeds, berries and peanuts, are associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer. Source: Cancer Causes & Control Volume 17, Number 2, March 2006. Read More.

Study Concludes Fruit/Blueberry Consumption May Prevent Cardiovascular Disease
A November 2005 study released by Appalachian State University’s Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science found that daily fruit consumption significantly reduces oxidative stress in chronic smokers. The results were obtained by observing twenty chronic smokers over a three week period. The subjects were divided into three groups: the first group consumed 250g of blueberries daily, the second group consumed 250g of blueberries right before the final blood testing and the third was a control group and did nothing. The subjects’ blood was drawn at the beginning and end of the study. The study concluded that acute ingestion of fruit had no affect on oxidative stress levels in the blood while daily fruit consumption significantly reduced this oxidation. The study states that fruit consumption plays a role in preventing cardiovascular disease. For more information, go to Free Radical Research, November 2005. Source: Taylor & Francis, Volume 39, Number 11, November 2005. Read More.

Study Results Show That High Intake of Carotenoid-Rich Fruit and Vegetables Reduces C-Reactive Protein in Healthy Non-Smoking Men
A recent study conducted in Germany investigated the effects of low, medium, and high intakes of fruit and vegetables on markers of immune functions which included nonspecific markers of inflammation. The randomized controlled trial lasted eight weeks and involved nonsmoking men. For the first four weeks of the trial all the men consumed a diet including less than 2 servings of fruit and vegetables per day. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups to intake 2 servings per day, 5 servings per day, or 8 servings per day of carotenoid-rich vegetables and fruit for and additional four week period. Blood plasma concentrations of vitamins C and E and carotenoids were measured. The assessment of immunologic and inflammatory markers included the number and activity of natural killer cells, secretion of cytokines, lymphocyte proliferation, and plasma C-reactive protein concentrations. Based on the results of their assessment, researchers determined that in healthy, well-nourished, nonsmoking men, 4 weeks of low or high intakes of carotenoid-rich fruit and vegetables did not affect markers of immune function. However, a high intake of fruit and vegetables may reduce inflammatory processes, as indicated by the reduction of plasma C-reactive protein. C-reactive protein is a protein found in blood that is a marker for inflammation and heart disease risk. More research in this area would help to support the findings of this study. Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 82, November 2005. Read More.

Fruit and Vegetable Intake Boosts Bone Strength During Teenage Years
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns recently unveiled a child-friendly version of the new MyPyramid Food Guidance System called MyPyramid For Kids. This new system provides age-appropriate information about the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the MyPyramid Food Guidance System released in the early part of 2005. It is specifically designed for 6 to 11-year-old children, with the hope that sound dietary advice combined with an interactive computer game featuring a rocket ship will help combat the growing obesity epidemic among children. The key messages of MyPyramid For Kids are to be physically active every day and to choose a wide variety of healthy foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, good sources of fat, and some dairy and lean meats. Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Read More.

USDA Unveils Food Pyramid for Kids
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns recently unveiled a child-friendly version of the new MyPyramid Food Guidance System called MyPyramid For Kids. This new system provides age-appropriate information about the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the MyPyramid Food Guidance System released in the early part of 2005. It is specifically designed for 6 to 11-year-old children, with the hope that sound dietary advice combined with an interactive computer game featuring a rocket ship will help combat the growing obesity epidemic among children. The key messages of MyPyramid For Kids are to be physically active every day and to choose a wide variety of healthy foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, good sources of fat, and some dairy and lean meats.

Source: United States Department of Agriculture

Diet Rich in Soy, Fruits and Vegetables May Reduce Lung Cancer Risk
According to a recent scientific research study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, especially those containing soy foods, appears to reduce the risk of developing lung cancer. Researchers say that although these findings are important, confirmation is still required in large-scale, hypothesis-driven, prospective studies.

Source: The Journal of the American Medical Association, September 28, 2005

Following a Mediterranean Diet Is Associated with Total Antioxidant Capacity in Healthy Adults
According to a recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, plant sterol consumption significantly reduced the LDL-cholesterol concentrations in both nondiabetic and diabetic subjects. There was also a decrease in absolute non-HDL-cholesterol concentrations after treatment in both groups. Plant sterols are plant extracts that are found in certain plants.

They are present naturally in small quantities in many fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, beans, and other plant foods containing fats and oils. Additional research in this area is needed to confirm these findings.

Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, September 2005

Tumeric Compound May Inhibit Skin Cancer
Researchers from the University of Texas recently concluded an in vitro (laboratory dish) study which determined that curcumin, a compound found in tumeric, has potent antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on melanoma cells. These effects were associated with the suppression of NF-ΚB and IKK activities but were independent of the B-Raf/MEK/ERK and Akt pathways. Melanoma is skin cancer that begins in the cells that produce skin coloring (melanocytes).

Source: Cancer, Volume, July 2005

Plant Sterols Effective in Lowering Cholesterol
According to a recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, plant sterol consumption significantly reduced the LDL-cholesterol concentrations in both nondiabetic and diabetic subjects. There was also a decrease in absolute non-HDL-cholesterol concentrations after treatment in both groups. Plant sterols are plant extracts that are found in certain plants.

They are present naturally in small quantities in many fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, beans, and other plant foods containing fats and oils. Additional research in this area is needed to confirm these findings.

Source: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 81, June 2005

Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables May Reduce the Risk of Cataracts
A food-frequency questionnaire containing information about the fruit and vegetable intake of almost 40,000 female health professionals along with their health information over time was evaluated for the incidence of cataracts. A review of the data suggests that a high intake of fruit and vegetables may have a modest protective effect on the development of the eye disease. A cataract is the development of opacity within the lens or capsule of the eye, causing impairment of vision or blindness. More studies are needed to confirm the findings of this study.

Source: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 81, June 2005

Cardiovascular Health Improved by the Use of Grape Polyphenols
In a recent randomized, crossover study, researchers from the University of Connecticut determined that supplementation with grape polyphenols lowered risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease. Polyphenols are a class of plant chemicals/antioxidants that are found in a variety of plants. Ongoing research is being done on natural polyphenols to confirm these findings. Read More.

Oils From Vegetables, Flaxseed And Nuts Reduce Heart Disease Risk In Women
At a recent session of the American Heart Association researchers reported that the intake of vegetable oils found in green leafy vegetables, flaxseed and nuts have the potential of reducing a women’s risk of dying from heart disease. The scientists came to their conclusion after studying women participating in the Nurses Health Study; a study in which 76,000 women have been having the details of their health status and lifestyles monitored since 1984. One of the things they looked at was the alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA, present in women’s diets and the relationship it had to their health. ALA can be found in vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds. It was determined that the women with high ALA consumption had a significantly lower risk of dying from sudden cardiac death or coronary heart disease. ALA is sometimes referred to as the “universal” antioxidant because it neutralizes free radicals in both the fatty and watery regions of cells, in contrast to vitamin C (which is water soluble) and vitamin E (which is fat soluble). Further studies are needed before making a recommendation that women should consume a particular level of ALA in their diets.

Source: American Heart Association

Fruit And Vegetable Intake May Reduce The Risk Of Pancreatic Cancer
According to a Canadian research study, individuals who eat an abundant amount of fruits and vegetables daily may reduce their risk of pancreatic cancer. Published in a recent issue of the International Journal of Cancer, the study looked at the dietary patterns of 585 pancreatic cancer patients and 4,800 control participants with the disease. Men with the highest fruit and vegetable intakes were about half as likely to develop pancreatic cancer as those with the lowest intakes. The researchers were unable to explain why there was no clear association between diet and pancreatic cancer risk in women. Further studies are needed to clarify these findings.

Source: International Journal of Cancer, Volume 114, 2005

Obesity Widens Out To All Income Levels
A study has recently been released by the American Heart Association showing that the rate of obesity among Americans earning more than $60,000 a year is growing three times faster than the rate among the poor. Researchers attribute this to sedentary lifestyles and the increased intake of processed foods.

Source: American Heart Association

New US Food Guide Pyramid Revealed
Concerned about the steady increase in obesity, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently discarded its original food pyramid, which was released in 1992, and came up with a new pyramid concept to help Americans make healthy food choices and to be active every day. This new concept – now called the Food Guidance System – took the old pyramid and flipped it on its side. The new pyramid sports colorful stripes for each food group from the tip to the base, rather than horizontal sections of the old version. In addition to that, it adds a staircase along one side as a reminder that physical activity is key to burning calories and staying fit. Overall, the new program stresses whole grains, dark green vegetables, lean meats and poultry, low-fat or fat-free dairy, healthy oils, and a variety of fruits.

Source: US Department of Agriculture

Low-Fat Diet Rich In Vegetables and Fruit Helps Lower Bad Cholesterol
Scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine recently completed a study which evaluated and compared the effect of a low-fat diet rich in vegetables and fruits verses a conventional low-fat diet as it relates to plasma lipid responses in the body. What they found is that the low-fat diet rich in fruits and vegetables had twice the LDL cholesterol-lowering power of a conventional low-fat diet diet. LDL, or low-density lipoprotein, refers to a class and range of lipoprotein particles which carry cholesterol in the blood and around the body for use by various cells. It is commonly referred to as “bad cholesterol” due to the link between high LDL levels and cardiovascular disease. This new finding emphasizes the importance of nutrient-dense plant-based foods, consistent with recently revised US national dietary guidelines. Note that the two diet groups evaluated did not differ significantly in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and triglyceride levels.

Source: Annals of Internal Medicine, Volume 142, Issue 9, May 2005

Healthy Diet May Help Women Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
A recent study involving a group of women showed that frequent consumption of fresh juices, especially berry juices, and fermented milk products containing probiotic bacteria was associated with a decreased risk of recurrence of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The researchers of the study concluded that dietary habits seem to be an important risk factor for UTI recurrence in fertile women. They also concluded that dietary guidance could be a first step toward prevention. More research needs to be done to confirm these findings.

Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 77, March 2003

Fruit And Vegetable Consumption May Reduce The Risk Of Kidney Cancer
Recently scientists from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden completed a study that suggests women who are fond of fruit, salad and root vegetables are less likely to develop kidney cancer. The researchers came to their conclusion after analyzing dietary information from 61,000 women aged 40-76 and followed the group for 13 years.

Source: International Journal of Cancer, Volume 113, Issue 3

Fruit And Vegetable Intake May Lower Risk Of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
According to a study presented at the recent American Association for Cancer Research Third Annual International Conference, fruits and vegetables may lower the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a form of cancer, sometimes called lymphoma, that starts in lymphoid tissue (also called lymphatic tissue), which is part of the lymphatic system. The findings were especially strong for one or more servings of green leafy vegetables per day and one half or more servings of vegetables from the broccoli and cabbage family per day. Lower risks for the disease were also found, to a lesser degree, with higher intakes of whole fruits, red/orange/yellow vegetables and tomato products such as tomato sauce and juice. In this particular study, the researchers found no strong link to increased intakes of the individual vitamins A, C, or E, or individual carotenoids or retinol. Read More.

Nurses And Health Workers Lower Heart Disease With The Intake Of Fruits And Vegetables
According to a Harvard School of Public Health study involving 120,000 nurses or health workers, those who had a very high intake of fruits and vegetables had the lowest risk for heart disease. It was determined that for every additional serving of fruits and vegetables eaten regularly, a person lowers their risk for heart disease by 4%.

Source: Journal of the American Medical Association, Volume 282, October 6, 1999.

Nine Servings Of Fruits And Vegetables A Day For Men Touted By The National Cancer Institute
The national Cancer Institute (NCI) has recently launched a publicity campaign telling men to dramatically boost their fruit and vegetable intake. NCI says that past campaigns have promoted the need for five servings a day but that health experts now say that five is the bare minimum. They also say that the U.S. Dietary guidelines have always called for nine servings a day but a recent NCI survey found that 97% of men had no idea that nine is the official number.

Source: http://5aday.gov/9aday/

Increased Fruit And Vegetable Consumption Boosts Antioxidant Capacity Of The Blood
A recent research study set out to investigate whether or not a diet rich in fruits and vegetables would affect the antioxidant capacity of human plasma. Antioxidant capacity of human plasma refers to the bloods ability to fight free radicals. Free radicals are unstable oxygen molecules that can cause negative effects in the body. Blood samples of participants assigned to one of two controlled diets high in fruits and vegetables were taken and analyzed by a method called oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). ORAC is an analytical tool that measures the ability of blood plasma, foods and just about any substance to subdue oxygen free radicals in the test tube. Based on the tests conducted by researchers before and during the trial, findings showed that the baseline plasma ORAC of the participants was significantly correlated with their daily estimated intake of total antioxidants from fruit and vegetables during the previous year, and that plasma ORAC can be significantly increased by making fruit and vegetables more available in the diet.

Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 68, 1998.

Diet Rich In Polyphenols May Reduce The Risk Of Chronic Disease
According to researchers at Sookmyung Women’s University in Seoul, Korea a diet rich in a class of bioflavonoids called polyphenols (active compounds responsible for the colors found in fruits and vegetables) may reduce the risk of chronic disease by reducing oxidative stress. Oxidative stress refers to the excessive generation of free radicals, which are unstable oxygen molecules that can cause negative effects in the body. Nineteen healthy female non-smokers ages 19-21 participated in the study. Two dietary interventions were given, polyphenol-rich and depleted, lasting six days each, separated by a three-day break. Blood and urine samples were collected at baseline, day three and day six and were analyzed for a variety of indicators. The results of their analyses led them to conclude that polyphenol-rich diets may decrease the risk of chronic diseases by reducing oxidative stress.

Source: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Volume 22, 2003

Fruit And Vegetable Intake Contributes To Heart Health
A recent study involving 125,000 participants found that just one additional daily serving of fruit or vegetables lowers the risk of heart disease by 4%. Fruits and vegetables contain a wide variety of plant compounds that have previously been linked to overall improved health. Other studies have validated the positive connection between plant nutrients such as potassium, folate and antioxidants and lower heart disease risk.

Source: Archives of Internal Medicine, Volume 134, Number 12

Diet Lacking In Fruits, Vegetables And Whole Foods Linked To Colon Cancer
According to a recent research study, it was found that women who regularly eat foods high in red meat, sugar, french fries and refined grains have a greater risk of colon cancer than those who consume much fewer of these foods. Dietary information from more than 75,000 adult women without a history of cancer was collected. During 12 years of follow up after the data collection, the researchers observed a roughly 50 percent increase in risk for colon cancer in the women who had the less wholesome eating patterns.

Source: Archives of Internal Medicine, February 10, 2003

Fruit Intake During Childhood May Help Curb Cancer Later In Life
According to a long term study involving almost 4,000 people in the United Kingdom, it appears that a childhood diet rich in fruit may protect against the development of certain cancers. The findings, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, are based on a 60 year follow-up with a group of individuals who completed a food inventory checklist sometime in the 1930’s. The researchers successfully traced almost all of the men and women who had been children in the 1930’s and were able to assess their death and cancer records to arrive at their conclusions. Further prospective studies, with individual measures of diet are required to fully explain the researchers conclusions.

Source: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2003, Volume 57

Junk Food Diet Brings Scurvy Into The 21st Century
According to researcher Barbara Hermreck of the Lawrence Memorial Hospital in Kansas, a young man recently developed scurvy even though he was eating plenty of calories and had no deficiencies in most other vitamins and minerals. Scurvy is a vitamin C deficiency that causes a breakdown of protein collagen in the body, which is necessary for the health of connective tissue, bones and teeth. It struck the crew of Magellan’s around the world journey in 1519-22 and a British report in 1600 indicated that in the previous 20 years the disease had destroyed some 10,000 mariners. Symptoms of scurvy can be weakness, joint pain, loose teeth and bleeding gums. The student who developed the deficiency confessed to doctors that he ate no fruit and vegetables. The only types of food he ate were cheeses, crackers, soda pop, cookies, chocolate and water. After only four days of taking a multivitamin and a vitamin C supplement, his symptoms began to disappear.

Source: www.laurushealth.com

Adulthood Obesity Associated With A Reduction In Life Expectancy
According to a new study involving participants between the ages of 30-49, being obese during adulthood can result in losing three years of life. Obesity is defined as having a Body-Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or above. This index is determined by the relationship between a persons weight and height. A healthy BMI is considered to be below 25. Based on this study, it was determined that the risks associated with obesity are now similar to the risks associated with smoking. According to researchers, because obesity is on the rise, public health organizations need to make prevention and treatment option information available as their highest priority.

Source: Archives of Internal Medicine, January 7, 2003.

Cancer Experts Encouraged By New Research On Vegetables In The Garlic And Onion Family
Experts at the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) recently welcomed new findings from a study on the benefits of eating vegetables in the garlic and onion family. The study, conducted by the National Cancer Institute in Shanghai, China, compared the diets of individuals with early or advanced prostate cancer to the diets of healthy individuals. Those individuals who reported eating the most garlic, onions, leeks and such, were found to have nearly 50 percent lower cancer risk than those who ate the least. This reduced risk of prostate cancer was independent of body size, total caloric consumption and intake of other foods and was more pronounced for men with localized than with advanced prostate cancer. According to AICR, this study adds to the mounting evidence involving similar vegetables and cancer in general.

Source: Journal Of The National Cancer Institute, Vol.94, No.21, 2002.

Study Shows Fruits And Veggies Lower Blood Pressure
In a recent scientific investigation conducted at the University of Oxford in the UK, 700 adults participated in a research study to see if fruit and vegetable intake had an effect on nutrient levels in the body. Individuals in the group were assigned to two groups: those who follow their regular diet and those that were told to eat at least five servings of fruit and vegetables daily. Over the next 6 months, levels of vitamin C, lutein, potassium and beta-carotene increased in the group of adults encouraged to eat more fruits and vegetables in their diet. In addition to the increased elevation of these nutrients, there were also no changes in body weight or cholesterol levels. There was, however, a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. For more information go to

Source: The Lancet, May 28, 2002.

Bone Mineral Density May Get Boost From Fruit Consumption
Recently, researchers in the United Kingdom set out to study the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and fruit and vegetable consumption during the adolescence years. Several groups of boys and girls were measured for BMD and interviewed for their history of fruit and vegetable consumption. After an analysis of the gathered information was made, scientists concluded that high intakes of fruit may be important for bone health in girls. They also concluded that fruit’s alkaline-forming properties mediate the body’s acid-base balance. To confirm the findings from this observational study, researchers state that intervention studies are required.

Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 80, October 2004

Fruit Consumption May Reduce Smokers’ Risk of Bladder Cancer
According to a 2005 study completed by the Department of General Practice, Comprehensive Cancer Institute Limburg, fruit consumption may decrease the risk of bladder cancer in long-time smokers. The Belgian study followed 200 cases of long-time smokers and incorporated 385 controls to increase accuracy. It evaluated the interaction between fruit and vegetable intake and bladder cancer risk in its subjects. The study revealed no significant correlation between vegetable consumption and decreased bladder cancer risk. What it did uncover was a significant correlation between fruit intake and decreased bladder cancer risk. By increasing smokers’ daily fruit intake they were able to lower their risk of developing bladder cancer. The study concluded that antioxidants found in fruit may protect smokers from free radicals in cigarette smoke. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings. Source: International Journal of Cancer, December 2005. Read More.
Anthocyanins and Polyphenolics May Have Protective Effect
Because of the growing interest both from consumers and researchers in the role that berries play in human health, a research study was conducted to find out if anthocyanins and other phenolics present in black current and other dark fruits are effective in protecting cells against the oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide. Results showed that the compounds do have a protective effect in cultured neuronal cells. More research in this area would help to confirm these findings. For more information go to the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, published online January 2006. Read More.